UK vs USA words.

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by PDone7, Feb 28, 2012.

  1. PDone7

    PDone7 Member

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    Has this ever been raised before; words in from two dialects!

    I am English and say arse. You lovely Americans say ass. Are there any other differences?

    Hmm....
     
  2. Dragon_Fire

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    The fanny is the "front bottom" in Australia. :)
     
  3. PDone7

    PDone7 Member

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    that 'thing'

    you see I just cannot even say 'fanny'. I go for pussy. About the only word I think fits..:)
     
  4. Splendid_Thoughts

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    I always giggle like a child when I hear the phrase "fanny pack" (we call them bum bags here in Oz)...all sorts of weird mental pictures...:lol
     
  5. backcheck64

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    Fag in the US is a derogatory and disrespectful word for homosexual, yet in the Queens English it means cigarette.
     
  6. Texas_Red

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    Spunk vs. jizz or cum, etc.
     
  7. Trond

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    I think "faggot" originally meant sticks and logs used as firewood.
     
  8. 12barblues

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    heard a sound clip of a sportcaster from abroad, he said, (after a golfer had made a couple of bad shots,)...."he just needs to keep his pecker up" and not get down about it..
    Does pecker mean nose or chin or something over there? or did he mean the guy would hit the ball farther if he had a hard-on? :lol
     
  9. xeniadraven

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    ^^^ pecker is a term for nose, but i think more sportsmen should compete with hard-ons, us girls might take a little more notice then! ;-)
     
  10. 12barblues

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    in golf, it could give new meaning to the term "using his 9 iron"
     
  11. 12barblues

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    could give a guy an extra weapon in "nude fencing".....
     
  12. RideNaked2

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    :rofl
     
  13. Dragon_Fire

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    We use "fag" for both purposes, much to my boyfriend's annoyance. He says "I'm popping out for a fag" and I tell him "There's one living around the corner".
     
  14. MILF_Rider

    MILF_Rider Member

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    I like how a flashlight is called a torch and a subway is called a tube.
     
  15. HardRocker

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    We have airplanes and the Brits have aeroplanes. But we Americans do refer to aerodynamics. In medical language, anything here referring to blood is hemo, such as hemodialysis. In England they add an "A" so it would be haemodialysis or haemotology. Color and colour, honor and honour. Correct me if I'm mistaken about the last two examples.
     
  16. Splendid_Thoughts

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    You are correct...also neighbour...the list goes on. We Aussies subscribe to the UK way of writing and speaking (generally).
     
  17. cbrmale

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    A fair proportion of English comes from French (centre, table and about 30,000 other words). Some of these words are mis-pronounced in English (centre in French is pronounced sontr with a silent e at the end). Americans then re-spelled some of those French sourced words (center). Table in French is 'tabl', information has French equal stressing (in-for-mat-i-on) and so on.

    I always took the American ass as being a weak version of arse, as is used in Australia, New Zealand, English-speaking Africa and so on. As a writer if I write to Australian English it's very much like British English, but not American English at all. It's strange given my most recent novels are to be published from Canada and available in the US.

    It is a pity there are two versions of English, but British English is the one most commonly used. Very few who speak and write English as a second language speak and write American English, and almost all speak and write British English.
     
  18. CosmicEye

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  19. Texas_Red

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    In this vein, I love the phantom "r" that appears in British pronunciation of things. We say Supernova, they say Supernovar. Lady Gaga becomes Lady Gargar. And "aluminium" wtf? :p
     
  20. Texas_Red

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    There's a really simple answer for that, and it ain't because British English is inherently better.