juuuuuuuuuust curious

Discussion in 'General Sex Discussion' started by Jayce, Jan 6, 2007.

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  1. Jayce

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    When you ladies go to the gyno for your annual checkup, do they check you gals out for any/all STDs automatically, or do you have to request it for any testing to be done?
     
  2. cbrmale

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    I'm not a girl, and I'm not American, but I will tell you this: the pathology costs for a full checkup of STDs is VERY expensive, so I doubt VERY much if a STD checkup is done unless requested. Indeed, I will say it won't be done, unless requested.
     
  3. Rose

    Rose Resident Sexy Grandma
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    Since I don't have health insurance .... :yell :yell :yell :yell .... I rarely have a 'well-patient' check-up. I know they check for 'abnormalities' in the breast tissue and the vaginal and cervical tissue, as well as feel for lumps, etc., in the rectal area. As far as blood tests for specific STDs and infections, I can't say I recall any done routinely, without probable cause. The PAP smear is a customary test, and it can indicate certain diseases, but I don't think it does the gammut of STD testing.
     
  4. Rose

    Rose Resident Sexy Grandma
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  5. AnonymousOne

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    Jesus Christ ... $250?
     
  6. Rose

    Rose Resident Sexy Grandma
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    Yep! I have no idea what it would cost to get the 7-disease test from a regular family practitioner or gyn... :shrug - Take into consideration the office visit, and I would imagine it would be more that $250.

    But I may be wrong.
     
  7. schwa'd

    schwa'd New Member

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    the pap smear that you hear of is just taking a sample of cells to see if any of them look precancerous (starting to mutate or deviate from what others look like). if a girl wants std testing she has to ask for it, i don't know if a lot of girls know that...like well, if i'm going through all of this, it should cover everything, right? wrong. also, hiv and syphyllis can only be diagnoses with blood testing.
     
  8. Bluesy

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    Not only do you have to request it, you have to request the full panel if you want to get tested for everything. HPV isn't a standard test.

    Planned Parenthood offers affordable STD testing, kids.
     
  9. cbrmale

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    In Australia, we have a nationalised health system, so cost is not a personal issue. We also have State government-funded STD centres, where tests can be done away from the family GP, if that is required.

    I used to work for a hospital, and I did some risk management work for the pathology laboratory, so I know some of what goes on. First up, anyone having casual sex should have Hep A and B vaccination (free here, but probably costly in the US). The tests should be HIV, although it does return false positives, Hep C and the usual suspects. The actual cost to a lab of doing a HIV test is around A$150 (probably US$120), so a full range of tests is costly for someone. Syphyllis and Gonorrhea can be cured by antibiotics, herpes is always a risk, and condoms not always a prevention, but many adults carry Herpes 1 (HSV-1) as cold sores, which can be re-transmitted during oral sex. I personally don't include HSV-1 as a STD, although many do, because of its extremely high prevalance beyond sexual conduct (about 70% of the popultion as HSV-1 as a non-sexually transmitted disease). I suppose the inclusion of genital-bound HSV-1 suits people who want to make sex seem more risky than it is (who could they be?). Most people with Herpes will know case because the first outbreak is often hard to miss, most (but not all) have severe illness as well as lesions for several days.

    There is new immunisation for chlamydia which minimises the risk of cervical cancer, most cervical cancers being the result of chlamydia. The vaccination is free here, expensive in the US (and I don't know how the health insurance system works over there).
     
  10. Bluesy

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    It pretty much doesn't. I envy you guys your national health care. Though some people would say it's coercivesocialistwelfarestatecrap, *cough*, everyone I've ever spoken with who lives in a country that provides universal health care seems to prefer it to a privatized system.
     
  11. melicious

    melicious The Old Maid
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    Well, like everyone else here, I can only share my personal experience. My gynecologist knows that I have multiple partners, and knows to do the full panel every time. My insurance covers it. (Or it did when I had insurance, whee!) He also does a microscope slide of the vaginal cells and looks at them under the scope, which gives him a good idea if there are any becterial problems, such as trich, hpv, etc. HSV, or herpes, is tested for by swab and/or by blood. Unless you have had an outbreak and built up antibodies, the blood test isn't going to tell much (controversial topic, actually). So.... a doctor doing his job knows the signs to look for, and can tell if there are any indications that one has an STD far better than even the individual themselves can say, but to know for sure the tests must be run.
     
  12. schwa'd

    schwa'd New Member

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    most cervical cancers are caused by human papilloma virus, HPV, which is what the new vaccine is for.
    planned parenthood will test and treat (both partners) and retest for free, along with birthcontrol and condoms.
     
  13. cbrmale

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    Off-topic I know, but during my time working in healthcare, I found that the US has the highest medical treatment cost per capita of the OECD, with a lesser standard of outcome (and I know the details of how to measure medical outcomes, but they are way to complex to post here).

    The key to national health care in whatever form is reducing over-servicing by reducing the profit motive of private healthcare providers, gaining economies of scale, and purchasing medical equipment and drugs at negotiated discounted prices.
     
  14. cbrmale

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    Yes, you're right about the STD, it is HPV that causes cervical cancer. Unfortunately, the strain of HPV that causes cancer cannot be treated, once caught it is a timebomb, which is why the vaccine is such a breakthough.

    I believe the Vaccine is available in the US, and even though it may be as high as four hundred dollars (or more) for a round, it may be worth it. HPV is commonplace these days, and nobody wants cancer as a result.
     
  15. melicious

    melicious The Old Maid
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    Define "worth it". We each have to die of something. Some of us can put that off and the cause can be old age. But not all of us can. I think my thing is...... I know I won't be here forever. I don't want to know about it before-hand. I want to be wise enough, insightful enough, to know it could happen anytime. I don't want to dwell, contemplate, or hurt. I want to live every single day, absolutely to the fullest, and lose them only when my time comes.
     
  16. AnonymousOne

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    Yeah ... I'm not going to fully get into this fight with you. Too much time and energy.


    Economies of scale never come to exist in a government run organization. There's no incentive to reduce costs because you don't fully realize them as a firm.
    http://www.investopedia.com/articles/03/012703.asp

    You treat profit motive like it's a bad thing... which makes you a fool, it's given you everything you own. Profit motive makes the world go 'round.

    Lastly, Government rarely "negotiates" with the companies, it's more often the compnay being told what to do ... which just makes it an extention of government.

    *sigh*

    Edit: Read my signature ... and read it carefully, it certainly applies here.
     
  17. melicious

    melicious The Old Maid
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    A..... I'd like you to remember, please, that those of us who do not think, speak, and live with a politically driven mind are not less intelligent or less conversational. We are simply less political. So, put that in a way, please, that will convince those of us who live by the idea that avoidance is bliss, that political thought is worthwhile and necessary. Please?

    Now, for those of you who are curious: I'm not asking anyone to dumb it down. So I request that condescention be reserved for a more appropriate issue. I'm asking you to tell me what profit motive has to do with my ability to request and affort full education and testing at each visit. And tell me what economies of scale are. Not because I'm uneducated, but because my education is not in the area that yours is.
     
  18. Rose

    Rose Resident Sexy Grandma
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    I am not highly versed on this issue. However, I have heard that one reason meds are so expensive in america is because the drug companies in this company do the research and devolpment of the various drugs, which in turn are spread across the world. Some countries recieve these same drugs (from the same companies) for pennies, while we pay $100's of dollars for the same thing. So, in essence, the american population is subsidizing the worldwide usage of said drug.

    I am probably missing huge volumes of facts pertaining to this issue, so I apologize - but it still just doesn't seem fair that I work as hard as anyone - and yet I often don't have enough money to get regular medical care and testing that could very well save my life or heal a curable disease. Diagnosing, say cervical cancer, in the early stages can mean the difference in being completely healed, or dying. Once you wait until the obvious symptoms occur, it's probably too late. :ugh
     
  19. AnonymousOne

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    *bows* Apologies Mel. Oh and I don't have a politically driven mind. I have an economically driven one. ;) See?

    :bow $
     
  20. cbrmale

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    But read my posting. The United States has a significantly higher per-capita cost of healthcare compared to any other country in the OECD with lower standards of medical care by many measures. In other words, nationalised medicine does it BETTER for CHEAPER. One measure is mortality rate, life expectancy in the United States is declining, not increasing, and that is a bad sign. There are other more specific measures on healthcare (WEIS and so on) which point as to why there is a problem. I was not the financial expert on healthcare, but in my role I had to keep up to date in the industry and its outcomes for a couple of years, and since that time US health costs have risen further, and mortality rates have also risen.

    And I am an economist, and a former healthcare project manager, and I can tell you there ARE significant economy of scale in healthcare. Until I worked in the industry, I never realised just how expensive healthcare is, and how much could be saved by scaling up the size of facilities, and working those facilities (eg theatre) around the clock.

    If the Australian government tells US drug companies how much they can charge to sell their drugs in this company, the end result is not that drug companies must overcharge US consumers to compensate, because the negotiated price is generally only twenty to thirty percent cheaper at a wholesale level here compared to there (not pennies to dollars by any means). The reasons US consumers pay more for drugs are:
    1. they are paying 20 to 30% more at a wholesale level
    2. they are subsidising to a small degree nationalised medicine systems such as Australia, New Zealand, Canada, the UK etc
    3. they are paying retail instead of wholesale prices
    4. there isn't universal government subsidiy on drugs, with a cap per prescription and a cap per individual or family per annum

    Finally, I don't appreciate being called a fool, especially since I live in a country which has lower medical costs and longer life expectancy than yours. Whose the fool, the one who prefers to pay more to receive less, or the one who knows what works best in reality?
     
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