If your new years resolution is to get in shape this year

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by ninja08hippie, Dec 28, 2013.

  1. ninja08hippie

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    I notice every year a big influx of people in the gym in January. Here's what this thread is about:

    People who don't regularly go to the gym
    Post questions about things that you want to know, but don't want have to ask a trainer to get.

    People who regularly go to the gym
    Post tips about how to start out and answer questions that other people ask. Remember to limit it to tips for beginners, not other athletes.



    My tip:

    If you're starting out, at first do low weight with high reps. It'll build up your stabilizer muscles, which are smaller and can be injured if not built up a little first. The first couple of times in the gym, you should leave feeling sore, even though you feel like you could have lifted much heavier weights. :)
     
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  2. Silverfox

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    I have my own equipment, so I don't go to the gym anymore, but here are my thoughts.

    I agree with starting slowly, using light weights and more reps for the reason Ninjahippie pointed out. Don't try to bench press two hundred fifty pounds (or whatever that works out into kilograms) on your first trip. You'll hurt yourself, and then you'll stop. The key is to work the amount of weight up slowly, and systematically, so you feel successful, each visit. Feeling successful is important for the incentive to keep up the activity.

    And if you're not doing all the routines, or machines, that are available, add one every few weeks. You're not in a competition. Above all, listen to your body. It'll complain, a lot, at first, but there's a difference between muscle soreness from a workout and pain from an injury.

    Oh, and don't forget the cardio.
     
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  3. surreal_thoughts

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    I have my own home gym. Got some cardio machines like an elliptical, cycle, and a rowing machine. I also have a weight station and a bench with an Olympic bar and dumbbells and various plates that total around 550 lbs, a punching bag, and a speed bag.

    I like to improvise and use things around the house as well. Instead of a tread mill I jog outside or walk, I lift rocks and logs in the woods in my backyard, and I do various drills outside like running suicides and so forth.

    Best part it costs me nothing, I don't have to wait to use what I want, no long drives to a gym and I don't have to put up with gym rats. It took 3 years worth of a gym membership for me to buy my own equipment and I keep it well maintained and replace/fix things when need be.

    Know that my knee is a bit better I plan on cleaning out the basement this upcoming weekend with the wife, dust off my equipment and start out with cardio and low rep weights and see how my knee does and reacts.
     
  4. alwaystry

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    My tip? Stick with it , try and go on a regular basis. Every year I see all these people flood the gym in january , 3 months later they are gone. I was not able to keep it up this past year , gained 20 lbs ( it may have something to do with the beer) , but. Like previous years , three times a week at the gym burns it off pretty well
     
  5. Silverfox

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    Hope all goes well with the knee. Be kind to it, but preserve.
     
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  6. ninja08hippie

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  7. danrb007

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    I have never been one to really get into working out. I am a beachbody coach and have started many of the programs. I have never been one to be overweight or extremely out of shape. My wife is the one that is really in to it she lost over 75 pounds doing P90X. She is now a fitness instructor and we own a gym. She also is the hottest she has ever looked and we are both 52. But I do love how much energy I have when I am doing a routine on a regular basis. I just don't have that drive to workout that a lot of people do. I do drink Shakeology everyday and starting January 6th I am in a large challenge group of friends that are doing P90X3. I am hoping I fall in love with this one only 30 minutes a day.
     
  8. Silverfox

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    For those who have decided to hit the streets or outdoor trails this year, here's some advice. Dress correctly, warm up, and don't push yourself too hard.

    If you live where it's warm, all you need are a good pair of shoes and some anklets. However, it you live where it's cold, windy, snowy or rainy, in any combination, you need some thought and preparation, to be successful.

    There are so many possible products and combinations that I'm not going to try to go over them all. Some of the cold/wet clothing can be expensive, so don't buy five pairs until you know you're going to feel comfortable when you workout in them. I will point out again, a good pair of shoes is a must. If you're short on cash or don't want to spend too much, put your money into your shoes. They're like the tires on a car; they're the rubber that meets the road, and will influence your exercise experience more than any other single piece of equipment.

    The important notion is to be as dry and warm as you can. I live where it's cold, so on windy days, I need clothing that will break the wind. I also need a hat that's breathable, so I don't overheat. That may not be your issue. You'll need to learn your body. Here's a link to Runner's World website that has some suggestions:

    http://www.runnersworld.com/cold-weather-running/comfort-zones

    My brother-in-law lives in the upper peninsula of Michigan, right on the south shore of Lake Superior. They get incredible lake effect snows. An interesting alternative, if you live where it's snowy, might be snowshoeing. He took me on some trails a few years ago, and it was an excellent workout. Snowshoeing is his main source of cardiovascular training in the winter.

    If you're not into any other kind of workout routine, some basic calisthenics are advisable. Work especially hard on your core muscle groups, ranging from your butt, hips, stomach, back and chest. You might not think you use all those muscles to walk or run, but you do, and you'll be amazed at how much easier both the exercises, and the cardio, get when you work out both ways.

    You don't want to get cramps from cold muscles, so starting slowly, and warming up thoroughly are very important. Stretch before you start. Let me say that again. STRETCH BEFORE YOU START! There are many stretches and routines that have been developed. My wife does yoga. It's not my thing so I do something a little different, but having said that, much of what I do, as floor stretches, do resemble yoga. Here's what I've learned. I need to stretch my calves, thighs, hips, back, stomach, shoulders, chest, arms and neck. Wow, that's your whole body! Yup, because you walk/run with your whole body. Just as I pointed out above, that having strong core muscles will help with your cardio, having a loose, relaxed body will also help. Here's a link to give you some stretching ideas:


    https://www.google.com/search?q=stretching for runners&espv=210&es_sm=122&biw=1920&bih=964&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=ak7EUpn_KqS6yQGwtoDACw&ved=0CEQQsAQ#imgdii=_

    Lastly, don't push yourself too hard, too fast. You'll burn out, or hurt yourself, and that's a sure way to being unsuccessful. You don't want that to happen. You need to feel successful to have the determination to continue this change in your life. It's not easy, at first. If you're on a track, set the number of laps before you start. If you're on the street, or a trail, know the distance you're going to walk/run. What worked for me was, and is, to systematically increase my distance and/or my speed. The following example is based on the empirical measurement system, but for those who are metric, the same idea holds true. If you started out walking/running one tenth of a mile, and increased that amount each week, in a year you'd be up to 5.2 miles.

    So, dress correctly, warm up, and don't push too hard.
     
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  9. johnnyangel694u

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    I can't do trend mill because it makes my shins hurt. What causes it and what can be done?
     
  10. Silverfox

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    Well, my first thought is that your walking/running style must be different on the treadmill. Your foot/ankle/knee/hip is not in the same position when it strikes the treadmill, as it is when you're walking/running on the street or a trail. Let's face it, no treadmill feels like the ground.

    I have a different set of shoes that I wear when I'm on the treadmill. They have more lateral support so my foot doesn't roll from side to side as much as they do on the street. I know that sounds odd, but it works for me. You might give that some thought.

    Anyone else have any insight or an opinion?