I am worried..

Discussion in 'General Sex Discussion' started by laura, Dec 16, 2004.

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  1. laura

    laura New Member

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    Hello!
    Something happened to me yesterday and I am very worried. I was fine all day and I had lunch at 17:00. I took my contraceptive pill at 23:00 as usual. A few hours later, I began to feel very sick. I tried not to vomit because I would lose the contraceptive that I had taken before. At 3:30 am, 4 1/2 hours after I had taken the pill, i couldn't help it anymore so I vomited. It may be disgusteing but I have to tell you the details.
    I saw that I hadn't digested lunch, which was - as I said before- 12 hours before. Does this mean that I hadn't digested the pill also which was 4 1/2 hours later? Now, I am at the 10th day of my cycle and I had a sexual intercourse yesterday. What should I do?
     
  2. Logger

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    Dear Laura,

    You can look up your specific type of pill on webmd.com. There is a section in the medication ordinarily titled MISSED DOSAGE, or something to that effect. It tells you what to do. It seems that it would be handy to have a morning after pill or two onhand for such incidents. Is your pill compatible with the morning after pill?

    A Pill and other food reaches the stomach in about 20 minutes. Some food remains in the stomach for some time, as nutrients are absorbed into the stomach walls, I believe. The chemicals in a pill will diffuse, which should be complete in an hour or so, unless there is a time release feature. Diffusion, means the chemicals dissolve or disperse among the fluids in the stomach and may pass in liquid to the bloodstream and some to the small intenstines. So the question is how much of the dissolve pill went into your blood sytem in 3 1/2 hours, after dissolving in the fluids in your stomach?

    So 4 1/2 hours may have been enough time for a significant portion of the chemicals in the pill to pass to the blood stream. I would not hazard a guess at the percentage. Maybe somebody has a better feel for the percentage that would pass.

    Maybe insert contraceptive deushe, to kill any chance of remaining sperm. Maybe take another pill, from your last months supply. Maybe crack an extra pill in pieces, and take the amount you feel still needs to pass to your bloodstream.



    This is from FHI Famil Helath International

    http://search.fhi.org/cgi-bin/MsmGo...=Missed+Pill&hiword=MISSED+PILL+PILLS+MISSES+


    Missed Pills
    Pills should be taken every day, even if the woman is not having sex daily. Pill users should have available a back-up contraceptive method, such as condoms, in case of missed pills.

    If a woman misses one active (hormone-containing) COC, she is not likely to become pregnant. When this happens, she should take the missed pill as soon as she remembers, then take the next pill at the regular time even if this means she takes two pills in one day. No back-up contraceptive method is necessary when one pill is missed.

    If a woman misses two or more active COC pills in a row, she should take an active pill daily for at least seven consecutive days. During this time, she should abstain from sex or use a back-up contraceptive.

    If her pill pack has fewer than seven active pills remaining, she should finish the remaining active pills and start a new pack immediately (without using inactive pills of the old pack or taking a seven-day break from pill-taking). In this case, the woman will not have her menstrual bleeding at her regular time. If her pack has at least seven pills remaining, she should complete the pack and take her standard hormone-free break.

    With POPs, a woman who misses one or more pills should take the most recently missed pill as soon as she remembers and the next pill at the regular time, even if that means taking two pills in one day. She should use a back-up contraceptive or abstain from sex for 48 hours.

    Clients who often forget pills should discuss their pill-taking habits with providers, who can advise on how to take pills more effectively or suggest alternative contraceptive methods.



    Blessings
     
    #2 Logger, Dec 16, 2004
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2004
  3. Logger

    Gold Member

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  4. Logger

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    Dear Laura,

    I am not sure how much nutrition, liquid or a dissolved chemical, is absorbed through the stomach walls. Most of the nutrition is aparently absorbed by the small intestines, after the liquids and solids being churned into a slurry by the stomach muscles. The only article that speaks to percentage absorbtion by the intestines, that I found is:

    http://aolsvc.health.webmd.aol.com/hw/irritable_bowel_syndrome/hw6154.asp

    from Web MD

    May be best to take a whole pill. Some pills are different strenghts at different times of the month, so you might want to re-take the same pill you missed from a new month supply, and get the prescrition refilled.

    Blessings
     
    #4 Logger, Dec 16, 2004
    Last edited: Dec 16, 2004
  5. laura

    laura New Member

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    Thank you Logger for your detailed response. I begin to think that the patch is better...I will look up all the information and links you gave me.
     
  6. Shellen77

    Shellen77 New Member

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    I would give your doctor a call just in case. I do believe that 4 hours is enough time for it to be absorbed, but only if it was absorbed into the stomach. Some pills are absorbed into the intestines which takes longer obviously.
     
  7. laura

    laura New Member

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    That is exactly my problem. I wish I knew more about digestion. Do we have to digest breakfast first, then lunch and finally the pill that we took late or there is no order?
    There is something else that I don't know: when we miss a pill, the possible contraception is related to the intercourses after that day or before?
    I wish there was a huge book with all the answers to our questions about contraception. Sometimes I am not sure if doctors know everything about it.
     
  8. laura

    laura New Member

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    Sorry, I don't know how to edit my messages...
    I mean "possible failure of contraception" in my previous message.
     
  9. Logger

    Gold Member

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    Dear Lara,

    I believe that progestin stays in the blood stream and body for several days. So missing a day, by several hours, or even 24 hours, does not seriously deplete the level of progestin, as it takes 36 to 48 hours to reduce the level of progestin in the body to a level where increased risk of preganancy begins.

    PROGESTIN, from WebMd.com References:

    Progestin-only birth control methods, including pills, shots, and implants, prevent the ovaries from releasing an egg (ovulation), thicken mucus at the cervix so sperm cannot enter the uterus, and in rare cases, prevent a fertilized egg from implanting in the uterus.

    Birth control pills
    Progestin-only pills come in monthly pack. To be effective, the pills must be taken at the same time each day.

    Shots
    One injection of Depo-Provera is effective for 12 to 13 weeks.

    Implants
    Implants containing progestin are inserted under the skin of a woman's upper arm. The implants release progestin for up to 7 years, depending on the type of implant, and are very effective. Hormonal implants are not currently available in the United States but are available in other countries.

    Why It Is Used

    Progestin-only pills, shots, or implants are good choices for women who:

    Need short- or long-term birth control that can be stopped at any time. However, it may take from 12 weeks to 18 months to become pregnant after a Depo-Provera injection.
    Prefer a form of birth control that does not interfere with sexual spontaneity.
    Cannot take estrogen, including those who smoke and are over age 35, have longstanding diabetes, heart disease, problems with blood clots, or high blood pressure.
    Have migraine headaches with auras, or women whose migraines get worse on combination birth control pills.
    Are breast-feeding.
    Have heavy, painful, or irregular menstrual periods.
    Are taking certain medications, including some anticonvulsants, such as carbamazepine (Tegretol), phenobarbital, phenytoin (Dilantin), and primidone (Mysoline), and some antibiotics, such as rifampin (Rifadin) and griseofulvin (Fulvicin). Women taking these medications should use a higher-dose progestin method, such as Depo-Provera injections.
    Have anemia from heavy menstrual bleeding.
    How Well It Works

    Progestin-only pills, shots, or implants are effective methods of birth control when taken exactly as directed.1 Each method will not usually be used perfectly all the time by women and their partners, so typically the method will fail to prevent a pregnancy in a certain number of women in the first year of use. The following reflect real-life use.

    For the typical user taking the pill for a year, 8 in 100 become pregnant. The method usually fails because women forget to take the pill at the same time every day.
    For the typical user taking the shot, 3 in 100 become pregnant. This method often fails because women fail to get a shot after 3 months.
    The implant is the most effective method, with less than 1 to 2 women in 1,000 becoming pregnant in the first year of use.



    EDITING: The EDIT button is active for about 3 or 4 hours on this forum.


    ECP: Here is additional info on the morning after pill, from webmd.com references:

    Emergency Contraceptive Pills (ECPs) — a contraceptive which can be used up to 72 hours after unprotected sex — are an important option for young adults. Because ECPs prevent unintended pregnancy, they also help avert abortion and maternal morbidity and mortality. ECPs may also help sexually active young people realize that they need to begin using regular contraception.3 It is important that young men and women know about ECPs, so that if they have unprotected sex and find themselves facing the possibility of an unplanned pregnancy and its health and social consequences, they know that they can still act to prevent this occurrence.

    What are Emergency Contraceptive Pills and how do they work?

    ECPs contain a special regimen of the same hormones as regular oral contraceptives (OCs). They are reserved for an emergency that might produce a pregnancy — a broken condom or slipped diaphragm, non-use of contraception, or rape. A woman using ECPs takes two doses, twelve hours apart, of particular formulations of regular OCs, normally containing estrogen and a progestin.4 An alternate regimen of progestin-only pills — as effective as combined OCs but with a lower incidence of side effects — is also available in some countries. With either regimen, the first dose is taken as soon after unprotected sex as possible, but no later than 72 hours afterwards.

    ECPs reduce the risk of pregnancy by about 75%. This rate is calculated using the following estimation: if 100 women have a single act of unprotected intercourse in the second or third week of their menstrual cycle, only two would become pregnant if they used ECPs as compared to the eight expected to become pregnant without use of the contraceptive.5

    Informational materials, such as Pathfinder International’s training curriculum, provide detailed information on the formulation, dosages, and clinical management of emergency contraceptive pills.6 Some women experience nausea and vomiting for a day or so when using ECPs. Other possible side effects include spotting, temporary breast tenderness, headaches, dizziness and fatigue.

    Depending on when in her cycle a woman uses them, ECPs may work in several ways. Studies show that if a woman has not ovulated, ECPs can stop or delay ovulation. Delaying ovulation may be the main or only mechanism of action. Although there is little evidence, researchers hypothesize that ECPs may also work in other ways.7 If a woman has ovulated, ECPs may prevent fertilization; hinder the transport of a fertilized egg down the fallopian tube, causing it to reach the uterus at the wrong time; or prevent implantation in the uterus.8 More research is needed to determine if any of these mechanisms actually contribute to the effectiveness of ECPs.

    ECPs cannot cause abortion. The medical community and regulatory agencies such as the U.S. Food and Drug Administration define pregnancy as beginning after the implantation of a fertilized egg.9 ECPs cannot affect an implanted embryo. If used during an early pregnancy, the best evidence suggests that there will be no harmful effects to the woman or fetus.10

    What are the advantages of ECPs for youth?
    ECPs form an important safety net by providing a backup method in cases of unprotected sex.11 For young people who are not prepared for a sexual experience or had involuntary sex, ECPs offer a second chance at contraception.

    ECPs provide youth who have not previously sought services with an introduction to reproductive health care.12

    Family planning programs can provide ECPs and counseling for sexually active young people either in advance of need, to be kept on hand in case of an emergency, or for use within 72 hours of unprotected sex. Advance distribution with adequate counseling and follow-up is most important for youth using barrier methods, which fail more often than hormonal contraceptives do. Some young adult reproductive health experts advocate the provision of a package of ECPs with condoms, and vice versa.13

    ECPs aid sexually active young people as they move to sustained contraceptive use.14 ECPs should be viewed as a bridge to regular contraception, because regular contraceptives have higher efficacy rates. For example, the unintended pregnancy rate for condoms, as commonly used, is about 14% of women in the first year of use.15

    What are the drawbacks of ECPs?

    Like all hormonal contraceptives, ECPs do not protect against STDs, including HIV.

    Because many young women do not act until they have missed a menstrual period, they may miss the opportunity to use ECPs to prevent pregnancy.16

    Because ECPs are only effective for 72 hours after unprotected sex, it should be made clear to youth that contraception is needed for further acts of intercourse. ECPs do not provide protection for the rest of a woman’s monthly cycle.

    VAGINAL RING PROGESTIN DISPENSER


    Contraceptive vaginal ring (CVR)
    The vaginal ring is prescribed by your health professional, but you insert the vaginal ring at home. The vaginal ring is small [about 2 in.(5.1 cm) in diameter], flexible, and colorless. Once the ring is inserted into the vagina, it releases a continuous low dose of hormones to prevent pregnancy for that month. A new ring is used for 3 weeks of each month for continuous contraception. The fourth week, the ring is removed, so you have a menstrual period. The exact position of the ring in the vagina is not critical for it to work because the ring is not a barrier contraceptive and therefore cannot be incorrectly inserted. For more information, see:

    How to use a vaginal ring.


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    Combination hormonal birth control methods (pills, patch, or ring)

    How to use the vaginal hormonal contraceptive ring


    A new vaginal ring is used for 3 weeks of each month for continuous birth control. The fourth week, the ring is removed, so you have a menstrual period. The exact position of the ring in the vagina is not critical for it to work because the ring is not a barrier contraceptive and therefore cannot be incorrectly inserted. The ring is not removed for sexual intercourse.

    The vaginal ring can be left in place for up to 4 weeks, but after 4 weeks of use, you may not be protected from pregnancy. If a ring is in place for 4 weeks, remove the ring, take a 1-week break to have a menstrual period, and then insert a new ring. If you forget to remove the ring after 4 weeks, remove it and use a barrier method of birth control until a new ring has been in place for 7 days. Discuss this with your health professional. A pregnancy test may be recommended.

    The vaginal ring is a highly effective method of birth control when used exactly as directed. About 3 out of 1,000 women who use the ring exactly as directed for a year will become pregnant.

    Insertion and removal of the ring is similar to using a diaphragm, except the ring is left in place for 3 weeks.

    What to do if the ring slips out of the vagina
    If a vaginal ring slips out and it is out of the vagina for less than 3 hours, you are still protected from pregnancy. The ring can be rinsed and reinserted. If the ring is out of the vagina for more than 3 hours, you may not be protected from pregnancy. The ring can be rinsed and reinserted, but an extra method of birth control should be used until the ring has been back in the vagina for 7 days in a row. If you lose the vaginal ring, a new ring should be inserted and used on the same schedule as the lost ring; a backup method of birth control, such as a condom, should be used until the new ring has been in place for 7 days.

    When to start using the vaginal ring may vary depending on what contraceptive method you were using before.

    Did not use hormonal contraception last month
    Count the first day of your menstrual period as Day 1.
    Insert the vaginal ring between Day 1 and Day 5, but no later than Day 5, even if you are still bleeding.
    For the first cycle of using the vaginal ring, use an extra method of birth control for the first 7 days of ring use.

    Switching from a combination (estrogen plus progestin) pill
    Insert the vaginal ring within 7 days of taking your last pill, but no later than the day you would start a new pill cycle.
    No extra method of birth control is needed.

    Switching from a progestin-only mini-pill, implant, injection, or IUD
    Mini-pill: Insert the vaginal ring on any day of the month, but do not skip any days between your last pill and the first day of ring use.
    Implant: Insert the vaginal ring on the same day you have your implant removed.
    Injection: Insert the vaginal ring on the same day your next injection is due.
    IUD: Insert the vaginal ring on the same day you have your IUD removed.
    Use an extra method of birth control for the first 7 days of ring use.

    After a first-trimester miscarriage or therapeutic abortion
    Insert the vaginal ring within 5 days of a miscarriage or therapeutic abortion. No extra method of birth control is needed.
    If a ring is not inserted within 5 days, start using the ring at the time of your next menstrual period. See the Did not use hormonal contraception last month section above.
     
  10. sexykitten07

    sexykitten07 New Member

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    My experience

    I am on the pill, and I would think you would be totally fine as long as you take your pills regularly. You are allowed to miss one pill a month and still be okay. Honestly I wouldn't worry.
     
  11. laura

    laura New Member

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    I happened to be on the web and I just want to thank you for your support. You've helped me a lot. Fortunately, I got my period last week so everything is fine. I love you all!!!!!
     
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