English or American/English test

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by Kronnie, Jun 15, 2007.

  1. Kronnie

    Kronnie Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,740
    Likes Received:
    7
  2. LaVitaDolce

    LaVitaDolce New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 30, 2007
    Messages:
    803
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    Sunshine State
    You filled in 10 word(s) out of 10 correctly.
    That's 100%.

    British English American English
    shop
    autumn
    lorry
    railway
    neighbour
    check
    theater
    gas
    harbor
    railroad
     
  3. Bluesy

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Aug 18, 2006
    Messages:
    3,779
    Likes Received:
    14
    Gender:
    Female
    Oops, missed one.

    British English
    flat
    lorry
    harbour
    petrol
    programme
    mum

    American English
    railroad
    elevator
    truck

    Wrong answer(s):
    postman

    I'm surprised I got 9/10. I mostly read books by British authors; it's wreaked havoc with my vocabulary :ugh ;)
     
  4. cbrmale

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    3,493
    Likes Received:
    291
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Canberra
    Ten out of ten. I write novels for the Australian and British markets, so I need to be well aware of those insidious Americanisms.
     
  5. Kronnie

    Kronnie Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,740
    Likes Received:
    7
    The English English spell the words correctly.... :p :p :p
     
  6. cbrmale

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    3,493
    Likes Received:
    291
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Canberra
    There are two types of English: English and American English. English is spoken and spelt by more than England: Australia, New Zealand, South Africa and and almost everywhere that was colonised by Britain in centuries past. American English is isolated to the US and (I think) Canada has a mixture of the two types.

    American English spellings evolved in the late 18th century in an attempt to match spellings to pronounciations, although as many know the drawling American accent originated in the west counties of England. The pronounciations from these west counties are, in turn, influenced by the Cornish and Devonian languages which have largely disappeared.

    For example, Americans spell categorize and analyze because that is how they pronouce it, whereas the rest of us pronounce these words with a distinctive 's' sound. Of course there is no sense in having a 'u' in colour or a trailing 'me' in programme, but given English is a hybrid of Saxon, Danish, French and Latin, it is no wonder that spellings are all over the place.
     
  7. Kronnie

    Kronnie Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,740
    Likes Received:
    7
    Yeah the English stole words from other european countreis that had be taken over by us.

    Colonised many hundreds of years ago, but mainly given back in this century
    England as we all know ( or should ) is the country that held 9 and still on record held ) the largest Empire of all.

    Not that, that is anything to be proud of.
    But American enlish also has changed words to fit their own devices...
    one clear example
    England ( pavement)
    America ( Sidewalk )

    I just find it kind of fun, with the differences..
     
  8. Puss_in_boots

    Puss_in_boots Adminatrix
    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Apr 19, 2006
    Messages:
    6,443
    Likes Received:
    13
    Gender:
    Female
    The English language is a subject that fascinates me, which is why I made it my profession. There are currently 76 countries in the world where English is either a de facto language spoken by the majority of the population (e.g.: The US and the UK) or an official language designated by the government of a particular country. In many instances, for example India, English was made the official language in order to unify countries with countless native languages. The US and the UK do not have English as an official language, unlike Canada, which has two official languages: English and French.

    Incidentally, Sweden has several official languages, none of which is actually Swedish. Finnish and Skånska (the dialect spoken in Southern Sweden) are both official but Standard Swedish isn't. No one's been able to explain that one to me.

    In my opinion neither British nor American English is superior to the other, although English language purists might try to claim that the UK English is imminently superior to anything spoken in the US or Australia or any of the many countries where the language is official. This is despite the fact that Cockney English sounds about as lovely as a drunk Glaswegian standing in a Soho doorway. But at least it has character. The beloved BBC English didn't exist until about 70 or so years ago, when the BBC was established.
     
  9. Nettle

    Nettle Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Messages:
    358
    Likes Received:
    5
    Gender:
    Female
    Thank you Puss_in_Boots, that was really interesting.

    I tend to prefer English English, rather than American English, but I guess some of our spelling is a bit silly. Canada is pretty much the same as England with their spellings, but they still say trunk instead of boot, and purse instead of handbag etc.

    Alot of my American friends from the Interent expected me to sound quite plummy, like the Queen, and some were surprised when I wasn't, having said that, I do speak quite well considering I am from Essex, which can sound a bit common. But my mum was from the Channel Islands, and they sound almost South African with their accent.

    I know I have digressed a little to accents, but there are big differences in language even within England, and they all have their own way of saying things, which can be fascinating.

    By the way... I cannot understand a Glaswegian accent to save my life :lol
     
  10. dunny

    dunny New Member

    Joined:
    Jun 12, 2007
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    Your results:

    You filled in 10 word(s) out of 10 correctly.
    That's 100%.

    British English American English
    colour
    programme
    flat
    notice board
    chips
    mum
    postman
    theater
    favorite
    gas
     
  11. Kronnie

    Kronnie Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,740
    Likes Received:
    7
    The English language in any form has been around for about 1000 years or so.
    Old english, middle english and so forth ( notice the one factor that remains, English )


    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/English_language


    I think wiki says it best and far more precisly
     
  12. Bella

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Oct 18, 2006
    Messages:
    5,930
    Likes Received:
    15
    Gender:
    Female
    [​IMG]

    Yay!!! I Got 100% !! :woohoo
    Now what do I win Kronnie? :shrug
    :lol
    ~Bella
     
  13. Kronnie

    Kronnie Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,740
    Likes Received:
    7
    I would say you win me at your beck and call :p hehehe
     
  14. Nettle

    Nettle Member

    Joined:
    Mar 19, 2007
    Messages:
    358
    Likes Received:
    5
    Gender:
    Female
    10 out of 10 but I messed up the copy and pasting so i can't show it.
     
  15. Kronnie

    Kronnie Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,740
    Likes Received:
    7
    Thats okies Nettle i know you wouldnt lie hun :)
     
  16. cbrmale

    Gold Member

    Joined:
    Sep 26, 2006
    Messages:
    3,493
    Likes Received:
    291
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Canberra
    Old English is unrecognisable to English-speakers, post-1066 and the beginnings of something we can understand is starting to appear.

    American English not only sounds and spells differently, it is spoken more informally than the rest of the English-speaking world, and not BBC-standard English either. When writing novels, dialogue for Australians or other English-speaking nationalities is quite different to the dialogue for Americans. I have only written one scene featuring Americans and one Australian, and I played up the dialogue and cultural differences quite a bit, turning it into something quite amusing. Compared to Australians, Americans are very much master-servant, and this cultural trait often gets them into trouble when travelling internationally. For example: you would never go into a shop in Australia and ask for assistance without 'excuse me, can you please...' or in France with 'Pardon monsieur, Je voudrais (whatever) si'l vous plais.'

    Stephen King noted this in a book he wrote called 'on writing', where he thought a throw-away television advertisement in Britain had more formality than an evening television news bulletin in the United States.
     
  17. BluShrtVigilanT

    BluShrtVigilanT New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 24, 2007
    Messages:
    197
    Likes Received:
    3
    Gender:
    Male
    You filled in 10 word(s) out of 10 correctly.
    That's 100%.

    British English
    town centre
    shop
    flat
    mum
    chips

    American English
    center
    mom
    neighbor
    theater
    store

    YAY for watching Shaun of the Dead, Mr. Bean, and Blackadder far too many times!!
     
  18. Kronnie

    Kronnie Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,740
    Likes Received:
    7
    I guess the Englands english spoken language is just politer same as in France opoliteness is a must in most cases..

    and roflmao i havnt seen sean of the dead for a while , but that film kicks some serious buttness ...

    Comman English and posh english are completly different languages in themselves...

    And the concept of the Queeens English is just crap being as adolf hilter was as english as the queen heehehe

    Sorry for the picture below i just wanted to see if it would work

    [​IMG]
     
  19. Mr Johnson

    Mr Johnson New Member

    Joined:
    Apr 28, 2007
    Messages:
    92
    Likes Received:
    0
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    MD
    [rickybobby]
    I speak American! Because I'm in America!
    [/rickybobby]

    For the longest time, I had no idea that England English was spelled different than American English.

    9/10, I got postman wrong, since I call him the postman here.
     
  20. Kronnie

    Kronnie Banned

    Joined:
    Feb 8, 2007
    Messages:
    4,740
    Likes Received:
    7
    Lol....its def strange how certain words are spelt the same , and yet others are not