Dignity

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by whybother, Sep 23, 2016.

  1. whybother

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    Under what circumstances is it ok to refuse medical treatment. Is it ok if there is no terminal disease.?
     
  2. Mittimer

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    Once you are an adult (18) you are free to refuse medical treatment for any reason unless you are a warden of the state or deemed medically insane or incapable of making your own decisions. At that point it is the states or the doctors or your guardian or your power of attorney to make that decision for you.
     
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  3. whybother

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    No insanity or I capability, just tired of living and refusing medical care. Hard to surrender even when he has.
     
  4. whybother

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    Thanks for answering.
     
  5. Mittimer

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    If you're tired of living, you're tired of living. I don't necessarily agree with giving up, but there's a point that you have to choose quality over quantity of life.
     
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  6. MariaMaria

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    It sounds like you're witnessing someone make that choice. That must be really hard. Sorry.
    As for looking at this from that person's point of view, a person choosing no medical treatment is doing that: choosing, not necessarily giving up. From a philosophical point of view, they are exercising their most fundamental right to be free in a situation that offers no escape...a situation none of us would want to find ourselves in. Isn't that life in a nutshell, though? Some people actually get to choose how they die. This doesn't take away from the sadness of it all, but there's a bit of room for comfort in the midst of this too.
    I imagine (as much as I possibly can, very naively, never having been in that situation) that a person making that choice would probably need for those around him to offer love and support even if they don't understand his choice.
    (((hugs)))
     
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  7. Chet

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    I've had to deal with a few things in my family who refuse medical. Sometimes they are just done living. Sometimes it depression. Contacting a hospice counselor can sometimes clarify the situation.
     
  8. whybother

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    <3
     
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  9. Mittimer

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    I concur with Maria's notion. My grandmother made the choice when she had cancer for the second time to not take any medical care. None. She chose to let the cancer take over until she passed in a painful and what some would say undignified manner. But, it was her choice. Everyone ultimately has the right to choose whether or not they want medical care at a certain point in their life and it is our job as their friends, family and loved ones to support their decision.
     
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  10. Sweetlysad

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    My grandmother made exactly the same choice the second time she had breast cancer. She choose not to go though medical treatment. She didn't live close to family so we were not aware of how sick she was until she passed, as she choose not to tell us.
     
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  11. Mittimer

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    I lived with my grandmother and was there the moment she took her last breath and stayed next to her holding her hand until they finally took her away.
     
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  12. Sweetlysad

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    That's so sad :(
     
  13. Mikey22

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    My grand parents, Had the attitude that you don't trust doctors. Not that they refused all medical care. But they were good at putting it off. And they suffered a lot, Because of it. My Grandfather would go nuts, In the hospital. He would see bugs everywhere. And just about climb the walls, To get out. At home, He would be fine. Hospitals and doctors, Just had that effect on him.
     
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  14. Mittimer

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    It was sad but if I had the chance to go back and do it again, I would in a heartbeat. She was an amazing woman that I tell my husband regularly how much he would have loved her. She was strong, determined, snarky and all sorts of dirty lol

    The day she passed she woke up very briefly (for the first time in days) before I left for school while I was sitting next to her bed telling her how much I loved her. I kissed her head, told her I was off to school and see her when I got back. She opened her eyes and choked out "I love you too, goodbye Suzy-Q" and never woke up again until she passed later that evening. I would do it a thousand times over again.
     
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  15. Sweetlysad

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    Thanks for sharing that. It's very sad and very sweet.
     
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  16. CLE32793

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    My sister has recently choose quality of life over quantity in her cancer battle. I don't know what I would chose if it was me. It's never an easy decision but I're read stories of states deeming people unfit to decide on their on and forcing chemo, for example, on them. A young boy that ran away from home to avoid chemo and is still alive, but he had to run away is my point to do the non-traditional medicines.
     
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