Books/Novels/etc.

Discussion in 'The Lounge' started by mr_orgasmo, Jul 28, 2009.

  1. mr_orgasmo

    mr_orgasmo New Member

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    What are some of your favorite Novels and Why?

    I would say that my favorites are The Pillars of the Earth (Ken Follet) and the sequel World Without End (Ken Follet). The story line is so complex, yet its in the midieval times. He makes you love the characters and their lives, envy a few, and then makes you more than sad when he puts a plot turn. He is very detailed and develops his stories and characters the best I have ever read in my entire life.

    Echoes from the Infantry (Frank Nappi), he develops the story and the characters as if this was a memoir. The troubles of the fathers past are something a real WWII vet would have, and the situations are more realistic. Better than "All Quiet on the Western Front."

    Dreamseller (Brandon Novak), this is the true story of a professional skateboarders drug addiction and rehab treatement. He tells the story how it is, and gets quite detailed about many situations. He has alot of memories that are disturbingly funny and unfortunate. This is a great book, you can't put it down.

    The Kite Runner (Khaled Housini), Great book with so much detail. The story of a young afghan boy who comes to America after facing hardships in Afghanistan. He goes back to Afghanistan years later. This is a really detailed book about the culture of Afghanistan and what they face every day over there.

    I love to read and I will read all books that look appealing to my taste in literature
     
  2. Puss_in_boots

    Puss_in_boots Adminatrix
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    I've got those Ken Follet novels you mentioned, but haven't gotten around to reading them yet. Usually I don't read a lot of sci-fi/fantasy but I did enjoy Ursula K. LeGuin's Earth Sea Trilogy. The novels are novelettes really, so short that you can read one in an afternoon.

    As a literature buff my favorite author in recent years has been the Welsh author Jasper Fforde. His first novel is called The Eyre Affair and takes place in a parallel universe where the lines between fiction and reality are a bit blurred. The protagonist is named Thursday Next. Many novels with the same theme followed it.

    I also love mysteries and crime novels. I'm just about to start on the second in a trilogy of crime novels called the Millennium Trilogy. The first two are: "The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo," and
    "The Girl who Played with Fire." The third isn't available in English translation yet. The Swedish author, Stieg Larsson, was a journalist before be became an author and unfortunately died of a heart attack in his early fifties and didn't live to see the explosive success of his novels.
     
  3. HardRocker

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    I like Follett. I've read:

    Eye of the Needle*
    Night Over Water*
    The Third Twin
    The Hammer of Eden
    Code to Zero
    Jackdaws*
    Lie Down With the Lions*

    The asterisks are my favorites.
     
  4. igor

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    I too like may on Follett's books. Also Tom Clancy, Robert Ludlum, W.E.B. Griffin and John Grisham.
     
  5. HardRocker

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    I've read a few Ludlum books and all of the of the Clancy books about Jack Ryan and John Clark/Kelley. Grisham writes entertaining tweeners, but I've never read Griffin.

    I read a lot of hard science fiction, but no fantasy, though some of the hard science authors have leaned toward fantasy for creative liscense, which I can accept. For instance, if Star Wars was a book, I would not consider it science fiction in the least. There is nothing about science in it.
     
  6. ninja08hippie

    ninja08hippie Official SF Hugger
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    Crime and Punishment by Fyodor Dostoyevsky, it's dark and the plot is complicated and a cool insight into the psyche of the main character after he murders an elderly loan-shark and falls in love with a prostitute, while seemingly drifting in and out of sanity.

    1984 by George Orwell, it was an interesting story of how in the future... well, 25 years ago... a power-hungry big brother nation has taken over and the underground struggle to overthrow it and bring freedom back.

    Flatland by Edwin A Abbott, is impossible to explain. The main character is a square, living in a plane, controlled by circles and other high level polygons and is visited by a being from the 3rd dimension. It's complex and very interesting, probably my favourite book. This book is so old that all copyrights have expired, you can get it for free on the internet, I highly suggest it.
     
  7. HardRocker

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    I need to look that up.
     
  8. ninja08hippie

    ninja08hippie Official SF Hugger
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  9. HardRocker

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    I just looked at it. Right now I'm into Aurthur C. Clarke's last novel, The Last Theorem. He had to let Frederik Pohl finish it when he got so sick he couldn't write, and he died before it was published. Pohl looks like he has one foot in the grave too.

    It's getting off to a slow start, but I take it as my duty to finish it, and it will probably be riveting in another 75 pages. I've been reading Clarke for 40 years, and now I mourn his death, as I also still do for Asimov.
     
    #9 HardRocker, Aug 3, 2009
    Last edited: Aug 3, 2009